Traffic exchange users are comparatively low quality, but they’re still real humans. You’re getting real people to view your site, you’re just not bringing them in organically the way Google intends. You can make money from these users, but your conversion rate will be typically lower than what you might see from organic traffic. Of course, it’s also much cheaper and faster to find this traffic than it is to invest in SEO and content marketing.
A widespread tool for traffic analysis is SimilarWeb, owned by the Israeli SimilarGroup: upon entering the domain you will receive the most diverse data straight away. The tool reminds us a bit of Google Analytics with regard to the scope and data formatting. The way these analysis results are displayed is extremely helpful: for example, they show the temporal development of traffic and the various traffic channels, like social media, direct traffic, or e-mail. There is even a breakdown of the most relevant social media channels: you gain a lot of information about the online strategy of your competitors.

Like Quantcast, the Google Display Planner also features precise figures and information – although, once again, this website traffic checker only provides estimates. Access is free of charge and there are no additional fee-paying functions, letting you check as many websites as you want. The Google Display Planner  provides all the important data you need to quickly analyze foreign websites.

Website operators pull out all the stops to try and guide visitors to their web presences, through advertisements, links, or simply high-quality content. To measure the impact of different measures, Google Analytics tracks the behavior of site visitors and sums it up in detailed statistics. But how does Google do this and how can this be useful for your site?
Not all web traffic is welcomed. Some companies offer advertising schemes that, in return for increased web traffic (visitors), pay for screen space on the site. There is also "fake traffic", which is bot traffic generated by a third party. This type of traffic can damage a website's reputation, its visibility on Google, and overall domain authority.[citation needed]
×