The Internet is positively riddled with traffic generators. They range from low-quality autorefresh bots using proxies to appear as though they come from around the world, to sophisticated traffic exchange systems powered by real people and real advertising. Ideally, you’ll strike upon the most valuable of these networks when you’re searching, but there’s a few problems.
Traffic exchange users are comparatively low quality, but they’re still real humans. You’re getting real people to view your site, you’re just not bringing them in organically the way Google intends. You can make money from these users, but your conversion rate will be typically lower than what you might see from organic traffic. Of course, it’s also much cheaper and faster to find this traffic than it is to invest in SEO and content marketing.
Be helpful – forget the sales pitch. People want to “solve a problem” – make sure you, your product and your website are focused towards solving a problem – whatever it may be. Whether it’s “What shall I cook tonight?” or “How to increase website traffic” – your social media marketing should all be about solving “Someone Else’s Problem” (a twist on the meaning of the SEP - with apologies to Douglas Adams). At CollectiveRay, our articles do just that.
Web traffic is measured to see the popularity of websites and individual pages or sections within a site. This can be done by viewing the traffic statistics found in the web server log file, an automatically generated list of all the pages served. A hit is generated when any file is served. The page itself is considered a file, but images are also files, thus a page with 5 images could generate 6 hits (the 5 images and the page itself). A page view is generated when a visitor requests any page within the website – a visitor will always generate at least one page view (the main page) but could generate many more. Tracking applications external to the website can record traffic by inserting a small piece of HTML code in every page of the website.[2]
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