Guest blogging is a two-way street. In addition to posting content to other blogs, invite people in your niche to blog on your own site. They’re likely to share and link to their guest article, which could bring new readers to your site. Just be sure that you only post high-quality, original content without spammy links, because Google is cracking way down on low-quality guest blogging.

This example illustrates why marketing metrics such as web traffic cannot be viewed in a vacuum. Two contrasting websites achieve the same outcome, where they are failing to capitalize on what they do well. By focusing on the one metric where they excel, it fails to acknowledge the area for improvement. By studying the whole picture and optimizing areas of subpar performance, ecommerce stores give their customers the best possible experience while maximizing revenue.


Web traffic is the amount of data sent and received by visitors to a website. This necessarily does not include the traffic generated by bots. Since the mid-1990s, web traffic has been the largest portion of Internet traffic.[1] This is determined by the number of visitors and the number of pages they visit. Sites monitor the incoming and outgoing traffic to see which parts or pages of their site are popular and if there are any apparent trends, such as one specific page being viewed mostly by people in a particular country. There are many ways to monitor this traffic and the gathered data is used to help structure sites, highlight security problems or indicate a potential lack of bandwidth.
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