I’m a big advocate of quality. It’s so much more important than frequency. In my experience, one great piece a month will get much better results than a so-so post once a week. But if you don’t want to reduce your frequency, you could try creating a format or series of posts that are easier to create, like interviews. This can fill in the weeks in between while you write something with more impact. Mix it up! 🙂
TrafficWave is, again, not quite a traffic exchange. Rather, it’s a valuable tool to use with the traffic you’ve already attained. It’s a fairly sophisticated autoresponder for email lists, with a 30-day trial and a suite of tools designed to help you put together the best autoresponses available. Use it in conjunction with any of your affiliate or referral programs for a sizable benefit.
In my experience, a lot of people are more open about sharing traffic stats then you would think. You see this not just in interviews but if you peruse through the archived articles on a blog, there’s a good chance you’ll stumble upon a “blog in review” or “traffic report” post. With those stats, you can start to figure out how much traffic the site is getting today.

Embed Social sharing buttons in your website – Facebook, Twitter and Google+ (yes Google+ is important) as a minimum. You may choose to add other social networks which are relevant for your specific website niche. Avoid using a 100,000 social share buttons because that increases page load time, make for a horrible user experience and will decrease instead of increase your traffic including your social media traffic. 
Thanks Brian for your article. I am in the healthy living niche. I want to team up with bloggers in my own niche where we can share material it makes sense to me. But I have my own unique message and that is what I have been devoted to! Dah! I see now that my focus should be on what is popular among my peers and add to this. I think I’m finally getting the picture! I am specifically into FOOD MEDICINE perhaps I should start writting about the dangers of a Gluten free diet! Not for everyone!
For another thing, the Internet has somewhere in the neighborhood of two decades worth of traffic bot programs littering the digital ground. Some have gone through upwards of a dozen name changes and rebrands, moving from one site to another. They disappear, leaving existing users in the lurch, never to receive support or updates when the program stops working. Then identical software comes out under a new name, charging anywhere from $5 to $250, scamming people out of their cash with the same back-end software.
Too much web traffic can dramatically slow down or prevent all access to a website. This is caused by more file requests going to the server than it can handle and may be an intentional attack on the site or simply caused by over-popularity. Large-scale websites with numerous servers can often cope with the traffic required, and it is more likely that smaller services are affected by traffic overload. Sudden traffic load may also hang your server or may result in a shutdown of your services.
Not all web traffic is welcomed. Some companies offer advertising schemes that, in return for increased web traffic (visitors), pay for screen space on the site. There is also "fake traffic", which is bot traffic generated by a third party. This type of traffic can damage a website's reputation, its visibility on Google, and overall domain authority.[citation needed]
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