Headlines are one of the most important parts of your content. Without a compelling headline, even the most comprehensive blog post will go unread. Master the art of headline writing. For example, the writers at BuzzFeed and Upworthy often write upward of twenty different headlines before finally settling on the one that will drive the most traffic, so think carefully about your headline before you hit “publish.”
The best websites have some common elements that have been proven to increase traffic (and sales): they use search engines to their advantage by crafting site content to conform to search engine optimization (SEO) rules, they use targeted search and email marketing to find customers, and they continue to attract customers with strong, interesting content.
This example illustrates why marketing metrics such as web traffic cannot be viewed in a vacuum. Two contrasting websites achieve the same outcome, where they are failing to capitalize on what they do well. By focusing on the one metric where they excel, it fails to acknowledge the area for improvement. By studying the whole picture and optimizing areas of subpar performance, ecommerce stores give their customers the best possible experience while maximizing revenue.
People love to learn, and webinars are an excellent way to impart your wisdom to your eagerly waiting audience. Combined with an effective social promotion campaign, webinars are a great way to increase traffic to your website. Send out an email a week or so ahead of time, as well as a “last chance to register” reminder the day before the webinar. Make sure to archive the presentation for later viewing, and promote your webinars widely through social media. If you're wondering how to do a webinar, click the link for some tips.
The truth is, dear reader, that content overrules everything. You cannot make a success of a site unless you have the valued content there to begin with, as a foundation for your work. If that content is not there, nothing will come of it. If it is there and it’s valuable, the rest will pretty much take care of itself (aside from the physical aspect of site performance).
The hope is that other content creators will find the page useful and refer to it in their content. If your article gets referenced / mentioned / linked, then it’s Page Authority improves and it’s more likely to rank …and get more targeted traffic. The key is to both produce something that’s truly worth mentioning and to build a network of friends who create similar content. This article (and video) may help: How Does Social Media Affect SEO?
Buying website traffic shouldn't be a replacement for SEO and other conventional methods of online marketing, but it can certainly give you that edge you need in the highly competitive online market. You can improve your Alexa ranking, time on site and lower bounce rate, but most importantly - it will drive potential clients and bring your website in front of your target audience long before you will see the first results of your conventional marketing strategies.
Josh Coffy talks how he decided to attempt a different marketing tactic for their (slow) growing drumming education company. The techniques worked for him so well that he generated 500,000 video views. From ideal posting times and ideal setup for the videos to taking inspiration from the big guys, Josh doesn’t spare a single detail when it comes to teaching you how to do it yourself.
Glen takes various examples of how simple ideas and websites have gone viral in the past. He made a Feedburner mini-site and emailed a mere six people about it and tweeted the link once. The site had made to the HackerNews homepage the very next day, garnered 500 or so back links in a single day and the domain is now a PR 4. The whole thing was made in less than a day, looks ugly and is not even properly optimized for mobile.
This post and the Skycraper technique changed my mind about how I approach SEO, I’m not a marketing expert and I haven’t ranked sites that monetize really well, I’m just a guy trying to get some projects moving on and I’m not even in the marketing business so I just wanted to say that the way you write makes the information accesible, even if you’re not a native english speaker as myself.

The web is built on links, and web users routinely use links to find the information they need. When a site links to your site, web users follow those links, resulting in web traffic, or referral traffic. When these backlinks, also called inbound links, come from high quality sites, they also tell Google your content is authoritative and trustworthy. This is important because inbound links from respected sites are an SEO ranking factor, so they can boost organic traffic, too.


The amount of raw data you have doesn’t help you much. Jason tells you how to convert all that data into money. You can learn which landing pages are driving less traffic and are low on conversions. You can find out which mobile platforms are driving the most traffic to your site and optimize accordingly. Also, you can see your referral traffic sources and invest in them more.
Brian, I’ve drunk your Kool aid! Thank you for honesty and transparency – it really gives me hope. Quick question: I am beyond passionate about a niche (UFOs, extraterrestrials, free energy) and know in my bones that an authority site is a long term opportunity. The problem today is that not many products are attached to this niche and so it becomes a subscriber / info product play. However, after 25+ years as an entrepreneur with a financial background and marketing MBA, am I Internet naive to believe that my passion and creativity will win profitability in the end? The target audience is highly passionate too. Feedback?
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