When the world is crashing around you, trust the data. Dive into Google Analytics and try to pinpoint where things went south. Think back on marketing tactics you recently pushed live and find the correlation. This should lead you to an internal audit, where you may discover an internal tool is broken or an external force is impacting your site. - Kirk Deis, Treehouse 51
However, the tool is often criticized for only being able to deliver data on a limited number of websites. This is due to how Quantcast works: website operators first need to set up a data collection feed on their website so that Quantcast can collect data and estimate traffic from then on. If a page doesn’t work, the tool cannot display matching results. Because of this, Quantcast only really offers data on large, well-known websites.
You have also mentioned Quuu for article sharing and driving traffic. I have been using Quuu for quite sometime now and I don’t think they’re worth it. While the content does get shared a lot, there are hardly any clicks to the site. Even the clicks that are there, average time is like 0.02 seconds compared to more than 2 minutes for other sources of traffic on my website. I have heard a few guys having a similar experience with Quuu and so, I thought should let you know.
When it comes to traffic for sales or leads it varies from industry to industry and country to country, on the top of that it requires other complex process that are suitable only for the advanced paid traffic masters. In this article I will be discussing traffic for branding and improving rank on several web metrics which are responsible for judging the quality of a website such as Alexa rank, Similarweb Rank, Domain Rating, WOT Rank and so on.
Can The Rebels Help You? Well, that depends. If you wish to pursue a LEGITIMATE way of earning online, following proven methods that WILL require some work, then yes. If you want to be able to look yourself in the mirror and proudly tell your friends and family what it is you do, then most definitely yes. Because as successful as each Rebel is individually, as a team, they’re pretty much unstoppable. And they’ll stop at nothing until each and every student of theirs becomes a success as well.
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When someone visits a website, their computer or other web-connected device communicates with the website's server. Each page on the web is made up of dozens of distinct files. The site's server transmits each file to user browsers where they are assembled and formed into a cumulative piece with graphics and text. Every file sent represents a single “hit”, so a single page viewing can result in numerous hits.
Web traffic is measured to see the popularity of websites and individual pages or sections within a site. This can be done by viewing the traffic statistics found in the web server log file, an automatically generated list of all the pages served. A hit is generated when any file is served. The page itself is considered a file, but images are also files, thus a page with 5 images could generate 6 hits (the 5 images and the page itself). A page view is generated when a visitor requests any page within the website – a visitor will always generate at least one page view (the main page) but could generate many more. Tracking applications external to the website can record traffic by inserting a small piece of HTML code in every page of the website.[2]