PBP is sort of a cross between a traffic generator and a multi-level marketing scheme, only without the threats that MLM traditionally entails. You’re not absolutely required to sign up under someone, though the program does cost money on a monthly basis. You’re granted access to traffic generation tools, as well as other promotional information and training. The MLM comes in with their referral commissions, which many people use more than the marketing tools themselves. There’s a sizable commission for enrolling new members, as well as seeing them succeed.
SEMRush is primarily a search engine optimization tool, meaning you’d use it as a website owner to help find and target keywords that bring you more search engine traffic. However, as a regular web surfer, you can use it to see what kind of search traffic a site gets How Search Engines Work & Ways to Improve Your Search Results How Search Engines Work & Ways to Improve Your Search Results Tired of searching a bunch of times to find what you want? Here's how search engines actually work and what to do to make your searches faster and more accurate. Read More .
When Larry wrote about the kick in the proverbial teeth that eBay took from Google’s Panda update, we managed to secure a link from Ars Technica in the Editor’s Pick section alongside links to The New York Times and National Geographic. Not too shabby – and neither was the resulting spike in referral traffic. Learn what types of links send lots of referral traffic, and how to get them, in this post.

Servers are able to compile every request for a web page, arming its operator with the information needed to determine how popular the site is and which pages receive the most attention. When a web server processes a file request, it makes an entry in what is known as the “server log” on the server's hard drive. The log gathers entries across posterity, forming a valuable database of information that the site owner can analyze to better understand the website's visitor activity.

I’m a big advocate of quality. It’s so much more important than frequency. In my experience, one great piece a month will get much better results than a so-so post once a week. But if you don’t want to reduce your frequency, you could try creating a format or series of posts that are easier to create, like interviews. This can fill in the weeks in between while you write something with more impact. Mix it up! 🙂

Use great titles for your content, titles which tempt or create curiosity – “How I got my website to load in 1.29 seconds” vs “Decrease your website load time”. Think “How I made Google my bitch!” vs “Improve your search engine rankings”. If necessary spend a lot of time  titles – they are the portals to your website. Especially if you want great Social Media traffic, you'll need to find titles which trigger emotional responses. Curiosity. Shock. Anger. Eagerness. Empathy.

When the world is crashing around you, trust the data. Dive into Google Analytics and try to pinpoint where things went south. Think back on marketing tactics you recently pushed live and find the correlation. This should lead you to an internal audit, where you may discover an internal tool is broken or an external force is impacting your site. - Kirk Deis, Treehouse 51


Social-If you have identified where your target spends their time online go there. One of my personal quotes is “Meet Your Clients on Their Terms, Where They Are”. Remember that you are in their space so act accordingly. If you jump on any social platform and sell, sell, sell you will not do well at all. Provide value, be personable and engage with others. It’s 80% give and 20% take on social.
Thanks for sharing these great tips last August! I’ve recently adopted them and I have a question (that’s kind of connected to the last post): how important would promoting content be when using this strategy? For example, through Google Adwords. As I guess that would depend on the circumstances, but I am trying to discover if there’s a ‘formula’ here. Thanks in advance!
Web traffic is the amount of data sent and received by visitors to a website. This necessarily does not include the traffic generated by bots. Since the mid-1990s, web traffic has been the largest portion of Internet traffic.[1] This is determined by the number of visitors and the number of pages they visit. Sites monitor the incoming and outgoing traffic to see which parts or pages of their site are popular and if there are any apparent trends, such as one specific page being viewed mostly by people in a particular country. There are many ways to monitor this traffic and the gathered data is used to help structure sites, highlight security problems or indicate a potential lack of bandwidth.
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