Brian, I recently found your blog by following OKDork.com. Just want to say you’re really amazing with the content you put out here. It’s so helpful, especially for someone like me who is just starting out. I’m currently writing posts for a blog I plan to launch later this year. I think my niche is a little too broad and I have to figure out how to narrow it down. I essentially want to write about my current journey of overcoming my fears to start accomplishing the dreams i have for blogging, business, and travel. In doing so, I will share the best tips, tools, and tactics I can find, as well as what worked, what didn’t and why.

Website traffic is an indicator of how popular content is. As a website operator, the corresponding value also gives you an indication of how much traffic you need to generate to achieve similar success with other projects. Suppose you want to build a profitable blog on a specific topic: then you should know how much traffic the most successful bloggers generate in this area. By using a detailed competition analysis, you can then estimate which measures work for the competition and which ones don’t – conclusions that you can then use for your website.

The hope is that other content creators will find the page useful and refer to it in their content. If your article gets referenced / mentioned / linked, then it’s Page Authority improves and it’s more likely to rank …and get more targeted traffic. The key is to both produce something that’s truly worth mentioning and to build a network of friends who create similar content. This article (and video) may help: How Does Social Media Affect SEO?
Embed Social sharing buttons in your website – Facebook, Twitter and Google+ (yes Google+ is important) as a minimum. You may choose to add other social networks which are relevant for your specific website niche. Avoid using a 100,000 social share buttons because that increases page load time, make for a horrible user experience and will decrease instead of increase your traffic including your social media traffic. 
Web traffic is the amount of data sent and received by visitors to a website. This necessarily does not include the traffic generated by bots. Since the mid-1990s, web traffic has been the largest portion of Internet traffic.[1] This is determined by the number of visitors and the number of pages they visit. Sites monitor the incoming and outgoing traffic to see which parts or pages of their site are popular and if there are any apparent trends, such as one specific page being viewed mostly by people in a particular country. There are many ways to monitor this traffic and the gathered data is used to help structure sites, highlight security problems or indicate a potential lack of bandwidth.
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