The way it works is quite simple - you choose the desired geo (country you’d like the visitors to come from) and the niche you want them to be interested in. You also choose how many visitors would you like us to deliver to you (the more you order, the more we’ll throw in on top for free) and over how many days would you like us to send them to you. After that - we take over, set your campaign up and open the tap. Using a mix of expired domains, the XML feed and other traffic sources, we direct the targeted visitors straight to your website.
Piggy back on the success of others. Create a presence on websites which are highly trafficked. This is beside the Facebooks, the Twitters, and the YouTubes. Figure out the relevant sites in your niche and get yourself linked in there. If you are a music producer, it’s Soundcloud. If you are a Joomla developer, it’s the JED. If you focus on WordPress, it’s the Plugins directory. Find the behemoth in your niche, and piggyback a ride on their success. It's also good to find a niche in your niche. Riding on somebody's success is a guaranteed way of increasing website traffic. Hence the reason people guest post. More on that later.

Many websites do not publish their traffic figures, so it can often be difficult to get accurate values. However, some commercial websites offer media data as PDF files or else on an extra advertising page: there you will find all relevant traffic figures and even demographic data on visitor groups. Because information about traffic and target groups is extremely important for companies that want to advertise on websites, website operators only publish their figures out of self-interest to woo potential advertising partners.
Like Quantcast, the Google Display Planner also features precise figures and information – although, once again, this website traffic checker only provides estimates. Access is free of charge and there are no additional fee-paying functions, letting you check as many websites as you want. The Google Display Planner  provides all the important data you need to quickly analyze foreign websites.
Hey Brian I must say it’s a awesome content you are sharing .my question to you is how did you transform from a nutrition expert to a Seo master I mean both subjects are poles apart so how did you learn SEO can you share your story because I find my self in similar situation I am an engineer by profession and I am starting a ecommerce business niche is Apparel no experience of watspever in Blog writing and SEO if you can throw some resources where I can improve my skills that would be a huge help
A good example of a basic but highly functional website would probably be Majestecsocal.com. However, the exact type of design you should be considering depends on your target audience and niche. In some niches (like the one the example website is based around), users would want to have everything in one place, and hence a basic but very functional design would hit the spot pretty well.
Here’s a quick pop quiz. True or false: All website traffic is basically the same, so quantity matters more than quality. If you guessed false, you got it right. Not all website traffic is equal. It is better to have fewer hits from people who actually care about your business than scads of traffic from people that will never purchase your product or service. When building website traffic, you need to find the right audience for what you have to offer. One way to do this is by looking at similar websites.
Before you say it – no, true guest blogging isn’t dead, despite what you may have heard. Securing a guest post on a reputable site can increase blog traffic to your website and help build your brand into the bargain. Be warned, though – standards for guest blogging have changed radically during the past eighteen months, and spammy tactics could result in stiff penalties. Proceed with caution.
Web traffic is the amount of data sent and received by visitors to a website. This necessarily does not include the traffic generated by bots. Since the mid-1990s, web traffic has been the largest portion of Internet traffic.[1] This is determined by the number of visitors and the number of pages they visit. Sites monitor the incoming and outgoing traffic to see which parts or pages of their site are popular and if there are any apparent trends, such as one specific page being viewed mostly by people in a particular country. There are many ways to monitor this traffic and the gathered data is used to help structure sites, highlight security problems or indicate a potential lack of bandwidth.
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