The truth is, dear reader, that content overrules everything. You cannot make a success of a site unless you have the valued content there to begin with, as a foundation for your work. If that content is not there, nothing will come of it. If it is there and it’s valuable, the rest will pretty much take care of itself (aside from the physical aspect of site performance).
Traffic is therefore a decisive success factor for every website. Where does traffic come from? How can you increase your traffic? There are important questions to be answered if you want to run a successful website. You can answer these questions with analysis tools, for example – one of the most frequently used is Google Analytics. This is an external service from Google that you can integrate visibly into the source code of your website. Most web hosts now also offer traffic monitoring options.

Traffic exchange users are comparatively low quality, but they’re still real humans. You’re getting real people to view your site, you’re just not bringing them in organically the way Google intends. You can make money from these users, but your conversion rate will be typically lower than what you might see from organic traffic. Of course, it’s also much cheaper and faster to find this traffic than it is to invest in SEO and content marketing.
A good example of a basic but highly functional website would probably be Majestecsocal.com. However, the exact type of design you should be considering depends on your target audience and niche. In some niches (like the one the example website is based around), users would want to have everything in one place, and hence a basic but very functional design would hit the spot pretty well.
I am going to start by assuming you have identified who your target is. If you have done that homework (which most small businesses miss) then kudos to you. I will give you 4 pointers to help you drive targeted traffic. I will also forewarn you that these will cost you a lot of time and possibly a lot of money so I would also advise you to speak to someone who does these things professionally.
Web traffic is the amount of data sent and received by visitors to a website. This necessarily does not include the traffic generated by bots. Since the mid-1990s, web traffic has been the largest portion of Internet traffic.[1] This is determined by the number of visitors and the number of pages they visit. Sites monitor the incoming and outgoing traffic to see which parts or pages of their site are popular and if there are any apparent trends, such as one specific page being viewed mostly by people in a particular country. There are many ways to monitor this traffic and the gathered data is used to help structure sites, highlight security problems or indicate a potential lack of bandwidth.
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