Brian, I recently found your blog by following OKDork.com. Just want to say you’re really amazing with the content you put out here. It’s so helpful, especially for someone like me who is just starting out. I’m currently writing posts for a blog I plan to launch later this year. I think my niche is a little too broad and I have to figure out how to narrow it down. I essentially want to write about my current journey of overcoming my fears to start accomplishing the dreams i have for blogging, business, and travel. In doing so, I will share the best tips, tools, and tactics I can find, as well as what worked, what didn’t and why.
We all knew how importance is getting traffic to a blog or a business page. Most of us also knew how much it`s important to get targeted traffic to the blog than the untargeted one. Without targeted traffic, you can`t make a single dime out of your blog. Major traffic for many blogs comes from search engines, of course from Google. But from last 12 months we`ve seen a drastic change in Google`s nature which forced all the blog owners to bind them to Google`s rules. Anyway I don`t have hard feelings with Google. I agree they`re striving hard to give relevant and quality content to users.

The Internet is positively riddled with traffic generators. They range from low-quality autorefresh bots using proxies to appear as though they come from around the world, to sophisticated traffic exchange systems powered by real people and real advertising. Ideally, you’ll strike upon the most valuable of these networks when you’re searching, but there’s a few problems.
We all knew how importance is getting traffic to a blog or a business page. Most of us also knew how much it`s important to get targeted traffic to the blog than the untargeted one. Without targeted traffic, you can`t make a single dime out of your blog. Major traffic for many blogs comes from search engines, of course from Google. But from last 12 months we`ve seen a drastic change in Google`s nature which forced all the blog owners to bind them to Google`s rules. Anyway I don`t have hard feelings with Google. I agree they`re striving hard to give relevant and quality content to users.
Piggy back on the success of others. Create a presence on websites which are highly trafficked. This is beside the Facebooks, the Twitters, and the YouTubes. Figure out the relevant sites in your niche and get yourself linked in there. If you are a music producer, it’s Soundcloud. If you are a Joomla developer, it’s the JED. If you focus on WordPress, it’s the Plugins directory. Find the behemoth in your niche, and piggyback a ride on their success. It's also good to find a niche in your niche. Riding on somebody's success is a guaranteed way of increasing website traffic. Hence the reason people guest post. More on that later.
Like you I am a scientist and like you did in the past, I am currently working on translating great scientific literature into tips. In my case it’s child development research into play tips for parents. I can already see that the outcome of my experiment is going to be the same as yours. Great content but who cares. I hadn’t even thought about my key influences. I know some important ones, but don’t see how they would share my content. I thought I was writing content for my potential customers. Is your SEO that works course the same as the content that gets results course? Sorry if I sound a bit dim asking that question.

"We started to experiment buying website traffic a few months ago. We tried several different companies that were worthless and their traffic was untrackable or nonexistent. We then tried SEO WEBSITE TRAFFIC and immediately saw the difference. The traffic shows up perfectly in Google Analytics so we could see that the traffic they were sending was 100% genuine. Better still was the fact that the visitors we received loved our site and kept returning. We now purchase a traffic package every month from SEO WEBSITE TRAFFFIC to increase our visitor base."
Brian, I recently found your blog by following OKDork.com. Just want to say you’re really amazing with the content you put out here. It’s so helpful, especially for someone like me who is just starting out. I’m currently writing posts for a blog I plan to launch later this year. I think my niche is a little too broad and I have to figure out how to narrow it down. I essentially want to write about my current journey of overcoming my fears to start accomplishing the dreams i have for blogging, business, and travel. In doing so, I will share the best tips, tools, and tactics I can find, as well as what worked, what didn’t and why.

Like you I am a scientist and like you did in the past, I am currently working on translating great scientific literature into tips. In my case it’s child development research into play tips for parents. I can already see that the outcome of my experiment is going to be the same as yours. Great content but who cares. I hadn’t even thought about my key influences. I know some important ones, but don’t see how they would share my content. I thought I was writing content for my potential customers. Is your SEO that works course the same as the content that gets results course? Sorry if I sound a bit dim asking that question.


Think interviews are only for the big leaguers? You’d be amazed how many people will be willing to talk to you if you just ask them. Send out emails requesting an interview to thought leaders in your industry, and publish the interviews on your blog. Not only will the name recognition boost your credibility and increase traffic to your website, the interviewee will probably share the content too, further expanding its reach.
We should warn you that we can not guarantee the improved performance of your website. How well the visitors from our traffic convert is totally dependent on your website. For starters it depends on what kind of website you have, as you might imagine, a website that sells expensive smartphones would logically have lower conversion rate than a simple online shoe store

Be helpful – forget the sales pitch. People want to “solve a problem” – make sure you, your product and your website are focused towards solving a problem – whatever it may be. Whether it’s “What shall I cook tonight?” or “How to increase website traffic” – your social media marketing should all be about solving “Someone Else’s Problem” (a twist on the meaning of the SEP - with apologies to Douglas Adams). At CollectiveRay, our articles do just that.


Websites produce traffic rankings and statistics based on those people who access the sites while using their toolbars and other means of online measurements. The difficulty with this is that it does not look at the complete traffic picture for a site. Large sites usually hire the services of companies such as the Nielsen NetRatings or Quantcast, but their reports are available only by subscription.
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