While you should be concerned about a sudden dip in site visits, there's often a logical explanation for it, if you know where to look. Sometimes it's a simple and fast fix – a coding error, for instance – while in other cases, such as an algorithm change, it might take a bit longer to bounce back. Either way, it's important to look for the root of the problem so you can fix it.

Holy Engagement! This was an awesome post, full of great info… and then I realized that 3/4 of the actual page was comments… which is even better for shares, SEO and overall engagement. I was lucky enough to attend an event where Neil Patel was giving some great blogging training and a lot of what you covered was there. https://www.thatbloggingthing.com/69-blogging-secrets-i-stole-from-neil-patel/ The simple fact that you comment back is awesome.
The simplest explanation for a sudden and unexpected drop in website performance is often analytics tags failing to fire. Always check tracking first to make sure website visitors are being accounted for before making drastic changes. Reconciling tracking issues will help mitigate the long-term impact. Additionally, making friends with your IT department will help avoid issues before they arise. - Nina Hale, Nina Hale / Performance Digital
SEMRush doesn’t just evaluate general traffic on a website. It also provides a breakdown of which keywords users searched for to lead them to your site. If you want to find out which keywords your competitors rank for, this tool can be very helpful. Like SimilarWeb, the information is not always completely accurate. Nevertheless, SEMRush works well if you just want an initial overview. They have a particularly good range of functions: you can display reports on domain overviews, organic research, and many other areas.

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Not all web traffic is welcomed. Some companies offer advertising schemes that, in return for increased web traffic (visitors), pay for screen space on the site. There is also "fake traffic", which is bot traffic generated by a third party. This type of traffic can damage a website's reputation, its visibility on Google, and overall domain authority.[citation needed]
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