Even though traffic is intrinsically tied to conversation rates, it seems that too many people have a lot of misunderstandings regarding the relationship between these two aspects. For one thing, the size of the traffic you get does not matter If it doesn’t lead to the kind of conversion rate you need. If you really want to earn money from the visitors coming to your site, they need to be of high quality.
Shane Farrell is the “been there, done that” guy in the IM space. From SEO to Amazon and plenty in between, he eventually settled on list building and never looked back. Also a successful solo ad vendor and partner in one of the largest SMS companies back in the day, he’s since turned to sharing his personal techniques for list building by releasing quality products that have been smash hits in the market. Also a successful coach, Shane’s reputation for integrity is second to none. 
Piggy back on the success of others. Create a presence on websites which are highly trafficked. This is beside the Facebooks, the Twitters, and the YouTubes. Figure out the relevant sites in your niche and get yourself linked in there. If you are a music producer, it’s Soundcloud. If you are a Joomla developer, it’s the JED. If you focus on WordPress, it’s the Plugins directory. Find the behemoth in your niche, and piggyback a ride on their success. It's also good to find a niche in your niche. Riding on somebody's success is a guaranteed way of increasing website traffic. Hence the reason people guest post. More on that later.
Buy leads from a lead selling site. These are supposed to be email addresses of people that have signed up to receive offers. You just have to watch that they have good fresh "double opting" leads of people who requested more information about your particular field or you could be marked as a spammer. Some of these sites will email them for you with your own email or you can buy separate leads and use a separate email site for the mailing. There are email programs you can use but then you have a problem that Internet providers usually only allow up to 500 emails per day, and if you're doing it every day they might (rightfully) accuse you of spamming and shut down your connection.

Be helpful – forget the sales pitch. People want to “solve a problem” – make sure you, your product and your website are focused towards solving a problem – whatever it may be. Whether it’s “What shall I cook tonight?” or “How to increase website traffic” – your social media marketing should all be about solving “Someone Else’s Problem” (a twist on the meaning of the SEP - with apologies to Douglas Adams). At CollectiveRay, our articles do just that.
Buy leads from a lead selling site. These are supposed to be email addresses of people that have signed up to receive offers. You just have to watch that they have good fresh "double opting" leads of people who requested more information about your particular field or you could be marked as a spammer. Some of these sites will email them for you with your own email or you can buy separate leads and use a separate email site for the mailing. There are email programs you can use but then you have a problem that Internet providers usually only allow up to 500 emails per day, and if you're doing it every day they might (rightfully) accuse you of spamming and shut down your connection.
This example illustrates why marketing metrics such as web traffic cannot be viewed in a vacuum. Two contrasting websites achieve the same outcome, where they are failing to capitalize on what they do well. By focusing on the one metric where they excel, it fails to acknowledge the area for improvement. By studying the whole picture and optimizing areas of subpar performance, ecommerce stores give their customers the best possible experience while maximizing revenue.
For a website to be successful it all starts with landing pages that convert well and have high conversion rates. This means that a high percentage of the people that visit your website also actually perform a desired action. A desired action could be the purchase of a product, a membership registration, newsletter subscriptions or clicking on an advertisement, but it can also be any action that you want your visitors to do that goes beyond simple web browsing.
This post and the Skycraper technique changed my mind about how I approach SEO, I’m not a marketing expert and I haven’t ranked sites that monetize really well, I’m just a guy trying to get some projects moving on and I’m not even in the marketing business so I just wanted to say that the way you write makes the information accesible, even if you’re not a native english speaker as myself.
As the name implies, 1MC is a program that allows you to rack up a sizable number of clicks to your website in a very short time. It advertises itself as a “fake traffic generator” and that’s really what it is; it’s not going to earn you any money through commissions or referrals. It may earn you cash through pay per view ads, particularly if you use a proxy list, but its primary purpose is typically for testing. If you want to make sure your analytics are accurately reporting clicks, you can schedule a number of clicks through the software and track them. You can also set it to freely spam a site with clicks, to test the server under load. You should, of course, avoid targeting competitors; they won’t take kindly to an unwanted server stress test.

The majority of website traffic is driven by the search engines. Millions of people use search engines every day to research various topics, buy products, and go about their daily surfing activities. Search engines use keywords to help users find relevant information, and each of the major search engines has developed a unique algorithm to determine where websites are placed within the search results. When a user clicks on one of the listings in the search results, they are directed to the corresponding website and data is transferred from the website's server, thus counting the visitors towards the overall flow of traffic to that website.
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