Guest blogging is a two-way street. In addition to posting content to other blogs, invite people in your niche to blog on your own site. They’re likely to share and link to their guest article, which could bring new readers to your site. Just be sure that you only post high-quality, original content without spammy links, because Google is cracking way down on low-quality guest blogging.
How much does it cost to bring in a visitor? Some web traffic is free, but many online stores rely on paid traffic — such as PPC or affiliates — to support and grow their business. Cost of Acquiring Customers (CAC) and Cost Per Acquisition (CPA) are arguably the two most important ecommerce metrics. When balanced with AOV (average order value) and CLV (customer lifetime value), a business can assess and adjust its ad spend as necessary.
We should warn you that we can not guarantee the improved performance of your website. How well the visitors from our traffic convert is totally dependent on your website. For starters it depends on what kind of website you have, as you might imagine, a website that sells expensive smartphones would logically have lower conversion rate than a simple online shoe store

For a website to be successful it all starts with landing pages that convert well and have high conversion rates. This means that a high percentage of the people that visit your website also actually perform a desired action. A desired action could be the purchase of a product, a membership registration, newsletter subscriptions or clicking on an advertisement, but it can also be any action that you want your visitors to do that goes beyond simple web browsing.


Guest blogging is a legitimate way to create a press mention (and link) on a credible website. It’s a powerful, but sensitive tactic that starts with empathy for the needs of the editor and their target audience. When used properly, a high-value article is published in your name on another site and potentially links back to the in-depth article on your website.
There are more than half a billion active websites under the sun and most of the (almost 70%) of them struggle to get traffic due to the high competition and expense of the process like SEO or Digital Marketing. However, you can simple buy targeted traffic from various sources at any time you want! Every paid ad campaign is an attempt to get traffic in exchange of money. However the reasons behind getting traffic are pretty different from each other. Some people buy traffic to get sales, some buy traffic to get leads, some buy traffic for brand exposure, some buy traffic to gain authority and improve rank on several metrics and so more.
The truth is, dear reader, that content overrules everything. You cannot make a success of a site unless you have the valued content there to begin with, as a foundation for your work. If that content is not there, nothing will come of it. If it is there and it’s valuable, the rest will pretty much take care of itself (aside from the physical aspect of site performance).
When we see a sharp decline in traffic, we first check the site’s code. During site changes and redesigns, SSL and 301 redirects are often overlooked, causing Google to de-index the site's pages and search rankings to drop. The drop in rankings can dramatically decrease visitors. So when building a new site or making changes to your current one, double-check your redirects before pushing live. - Michael Weinhouse, Logical Position
This information hits the mark. “If you want your content to go viral, write content that influencers in your niche will want to share.” I love the information about share triggers too. I’m wondering, though, if you could share your insights on how influencers manage to build such vast followings. At some point, they had to start without the support of other influencers. It would seem that they found a way to take their passion directly to a “ready” world. Excellent insights. Thanks for sharing.
Excellent post Brian. I think the point about writing content that appeals to influencers in spot on. Could you recommend some good, manual strategies through which I can spot influencers in boring niches *B2B* where influencers are not really talking much online? Is it a good idea to rely on newspaper articles to a feel for what a particular industry is talking about? Would love to hear your thoughts on that.

Another great way to get traffic is to join the social sites. They are popping up at an ever-increasing rate. By socializing with others on the net through these sites, everything you join or participate in gives you more people to see your site. And, if you're selling stuff from your site, you'll want to go to the places (interest groups) on the social site where people are interested in what you're selling.
Whatever industry you’re in, chances are there are at least one or two major conventions and conferences that are relevant to your business. Attending these events is a good idea – speaking at them is even better. Even a halfway decent speaking engagement is an excellent way to establish yourself as a thought leader in your industry and gain significant exposure for your site.
I feel I have great content…but most of it is within my email marketing campaign instead of my blogs. I’ve used my blogs to include links to my email marketing campaigns to lead to my product. In your opinion, should my blog content be the priority? I find my marketing emails sound more like a blog than just a “tip” or a reason to grab people to my list.
Thanks for a this timely article. If I understand it correctly, are you saying that we would better be off looking at market data in our niche and make an article of that for influencers to share rather than actionable tips that the target clients would be interested in? Shouldn’t there be a double strategy – articles for the influencers to share and articles for the users to enjoy?
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