To track website traffic you need analytics software. That anonymously logs every visitor to your site and keeps track of their actions. One of the most popular analytics apps is Google Analytics. It’s free, but there can be a learning curve in getting it set up correctly. If you don’t add your tracking code the right way, then you won’t be able to track your traffic. Consider getting an analytics expert to help you create the right setup for your website.
People love to learn, and webinars are an excellent way to impart your wisdom to your eagerly waiting audience. Combined with an effective social promotion campaign, webinars are a great way to increase traffic to your website. Send out an email a week or so ahead of time, as well as a “last chance to register” reminder the day before the webinar. Make sure to archive the presentation for later viewing, and promote your webinars widely through social media. If you're wondering how to do a webinar, click the link for some tips.
The truth is, dear reader, that content overrules everything. You cannot make a success of a site unless you have the valued content there to begin with, as a foundation for your work. If that content is not there, nothing will come of it. If it is there and it’s valuable, the rest will pretty much take care of itself (aside from the physical aspect of site performance).
Too much web traffic can dramatically slow down or prevent all access to a website. This is caused by more file requests going to the server than it can handle and may be an intentional attack on the site or simply caused by over-popularity. Large-scale websites with numerous servers can often cope with the traffic required, and it is more likely that smaller services are affected by traffic overload. Sudden traffic load may also hang your server or may result in a shutdown of your services.
You may also want to use a third-party website for advertising purposes: with well-placed ads on blogs and websites that match your target audience, you reach many potential customers. In this context, it also makes sense to check website traffic beforehand, since the more people that visit your site means that more people come into contact with your ads.
Note: There are literally dozens of places you can use a keyphrase, from captions to comments, web addresses to “Alt” tags. Feel free to get tricky if you’d like. But generally, the less visible it is to readers, the less important it is to Google. So focus on those elements listed above. That’s what readers (and therefore Google) really care about.
Gone are the days when a product page or blog post or two could serve as your sole lead-generation assets for the month. Nowadays, with more and more content on more and more websites, the bar has been raised for both the quality of your content, and the frequency with which you update your site’s content. Quantity applies to generally keeping the interest of your readers, but more importantly, it keeps the search engines fed and happy, and keeps your business coming up in search results.
Not all web traffic is welcomed. Some companies offer advertising schemes that, in return for increased web traffic (visitors), pay for screen space on the site. There is also "fake traffic", which is bot traffic generated by a third party. This type of traffic can damage a website's reputation, its visibility on Google, and overall domain authority.[citation needed]
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