The majority of website traffic is driven by the search engines. Millions of people use search engines every day to research various topics, buy products, and go about their daily surfing activities. Search engines use keywords to help users find relevant information, and each of the major search engines has developed a unique algorithm to determine where websites are placed within the search results. When a user clicks on one of the listings in the search results, they are directed to the corresponding website and data is transferred from the website's server, thus counting the visitors towards the overall flow of traffic to that website.
Thanks Jure. That actually makes sense. Exactly: I’ve tested lowering the number of tips in a few posts and it’s helped CTR/organic traffic. One thing to keep in mind is that the number can also be: the year, time (like how long it will take to find what someone needs), % (like 25% off) etc. It doesn’t have to be the number of tips, classified ads, etc.
Mark Tandan, “The Goofball”, is the oldest member of The Rebels but still thinks he’s a kid. He started in affiliate marketing and moved quickly into product creation, again teaching only methods proven to work. With numerous award-winning products in affiliate and email marketing, he continues to practice what he preaches. He ghost writes emails and sales copy for some very big names online, and has worked extensively in affiliate recruitment for other highly successful marketers. 

Target: Every Revisitors campaign is strictly targeted based upon your selected geographic or language target. Our redirection server resolves the geographic location of each visitor (as well as the language setting of their web browser) before they are delivered to a customer's campaign. That way only in target visitors will be delivered. While our geotargeting system is proprietary, results will be consistent with those of services such as the GeoBytes IP address location database (please note that we are not affiliated in any way with GeoBytes).


LinkedIn has become much more than a means of finding another job. The world’s largest professional social network is now a valuable publishing platform in its own right, which means you should be posting content to LinkedIn on a regular basis. Doing so can boost traffic to your site, as well as increase your profile within your industry – especially if you have a moderate to large following.

The truth is, dear reader, that content overrules everything. You cannot make a success of a site unless you have the valued content there to begin with, as a foundation for your work. If that content is not there, nothing will come of it. If it is there and it’s valuable, the rest will pretty much take care of itself (aside from the physical aspect of site performance).
In other words, actively developing your own media allows you to be in much better control of what results come up in the search results pages and for which keywords. When flawlessly implemented, this concept allows you to dominate entire search results pages, thus harvesting most of the search traffic for the chosen search terms, leaving nothing to your competition.
There were some great tips in this article. I notice that many people make the mistake of making too many distracting images in the header and the sidebar which can quickly turn people off content. I particularly dislike google ads anchored in the centre of a piece of text. I understand that people want to make a revenue for ads but there are right ways and wrong ways of going about this. The writing part of the content is the important part, why would you take a dump on it by pouring a load of conflicting media in the sides?
Google Adwords is the most popular method for traffic. Since they are the top search engine right now it make sense to advertise there if you can afford it. You bid on keywords to get your site at the top of the search when your keyword comes up. There is more involved but it's all laid out at Google. There are a lot of other sites that use this advertising strategy called pay per click or PPC.
Yep and sometimes it’s just being a little creative. I’ve started a little blog on seo/wordpress just for fun actually… no great content on it like here though… but because the competition is so tough in these niches I decided to take another approach. I created a few WordPress plugins that users can download for free from wordpress.org… and of course these link to my site so this gets me visitors each day.
Use great titles for your content, titles which tempt or create curiosity – “How I got my website to load in 1.29 seconds” vs “Decrease your website load time”. Think “How I made Google my bitch!” vs “Improve your search engine rankings”. If necessary spend a lot of time  titles – they are the portals to your website. Especially if you want great Social Media traffic, you'll need to find titles which trigger emotional responses. Curiosity. Shock. Anger. Eagerness. Empathy.
Web traffic is measured to see the popularity of websites and individual pages or sections within a site. This can be done by viewing the traffic statistics found in the web server log file, an automatically generated list of all the pages served. A hit is generated when any file is served. The page itself is considered a file, but images are also files, thus a page with 5 images could generate 6 hits (the 5 images and the page itself). A page view is generated when a visitor requests any page within the website – a visitor will always generate at least one page view (the main page) but could generate many more. Tracking applications external to the website can record traffic by inserting a small piece of HTML code in every page of the website.[2]
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