Another great way to get traffic is to join the social sites. They are popping up at an ever-increasing rate. By socializing with others on the net through these sites, everything you join or participate in gives you more people to see your site. And, if you're selling stuff from your site, you'll want to go to the places (interest groups) on the social site where people are interested in what you're selling.

A widespread tool for traffic analysis is SimilarWeb, owned by the Israeli SimilarGroup: upon entering the domain you will receive the most diverse data straight away. The tool reminds us a bit of Google Analytics with regard to the scope and data formatting. The way these analysis results are displayed is extremely helpful: for example, they show the temporal development of traffic and the various traffic channels, like social media, direct traffic, or e-mail. There is even a breakdown of the most relevant social media channels: you gain a lot of information about the online strategy of your competitors.

Too much web traffic can dramatically slow down or prevent all access to a website. This is caused by more file requests going to the server than it can handle and may be an intentional attack on the site or simply caused by over-popularity. Large-scale websites with numerous servers can often cope with the traffic required, and it is more likely that smaller services are affected by traffic overload. Sudden traffic load may also hang your server or may result in a shutdown of your services.
Monster-Traffic is another traffic exchange, though it’s initially a little off-putting due to the 1995-style website. It’s a free for all styled advertising list, where anyone signing up becomes part of the audience and an advertiser at the same time. You sign up and you can enter a link into their system, and that link is added to a roster that is send out to every member of the group. Additionally, registration allows a free solo ad; an ad that isn’t drowned out by other advertisers in that mailer.
Brian Gray, ‘The Traveler”, was born in the US, grew up in Africa and now lives in Cambodia. To running out of gas crossing the Sahara or having his father kidnapped by actual rebels in Africa, he has some stories and adventures he could tell you! He uses his skills from 13 years in the education sector to now dive deep into analytics, traffic and testing and uses IM to continue to travel and explore. He has had clients like the EU, UN, World Vision, Vespa, Hennessy and Hyundai (just to name a few). He is our resident paid traffic and social media traffic expert. 
While you should be concerned about a sudden dip in site visits, there's often a logical explanation for it, if you know where to look. Sometimes it's a simple and fast fix – a coding error, for instance – while in other cases, such as an algorithm change, it might take a bit longer to bounce back. Either way, it's important to look for the root of the problem so you can fix it.
Not all web traffic is welcomed. Some companies offer advertising schemes that, in return for increased web traffic (visitors), pay for screen space on the site. There is also "fake traffic", which is bot traffic generated by a third party. This type of traffic can damage a website's reputation, its visibility on Google, and overall domain authority.[citation needed]
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