I am going to start by assuming you have identified who your target is. If you have done that homework (which most small businesses miss) then kudos to you. I will give you 4 pointers to help you drive targeted traffic. I will also forewarn you that these will cost you a lot of time and possibly a lot of money so I would also advise you to speak to someone who does these things professionally.
Many small businesses credit SEM for attracting new customers. Depending on the competition in your business, relying on unpaid, organic Web traffic via SEO may leave your business far back in the rankings. By paying for SEM, you have more control over the specific keywords that will promote you, as well as where you will appear on the search results page.

A widespread tool for traffic analysis is SimilarWeb, owned by the Israeli SimilarGroup: upon entering the domain you will receive the most diverse data straight away. The tool reminds us a bit of Google Analytics with regard to the scope and data formatting. The way these analysis results are displayed is extremely helpful: for example, they show the temporal development of traffic and the various traffic channels, like social media, direct traffic, or e-mail. There is even a breakdown of the most relevant social media channels: you gain a lot of information about the online strategy of your competitors.
I’m considering a niche that I’m not sure I can find good influencers for – fundraising. School fundraising or charitable fundraising. I’m passionate about it but how would I get my articles shared by influencers? The non-profit sector is somewhat apprehensive about promoting commercial sites, unless it’s fundraising software. The name really says it all: “non”-profit.

2. Engage yourself in guest blogging to websites belonging to your niche. Blogs are a great source for traffic, guest post on quality blogs can bring back traffic from those blogs. Commenting on blogs can also deliver back links but remember do not blindly comment on every other blog, post the comments only when you have something important to deliver.
The largest search engines, Google, Bing and Yahoo, each have fairly simple programs to get started. You determine the key words or search phrase as well as the amount you are willing to spend (per click and/or per day). Most of them offer simple programs that require you to fill out a form and put a certain amount of money down as credit; you can also use a credit card to pay as you go. Like anything new, start small with paid SEM and add complexity (and budget) as you learn more and see results over time.

In other words, actively developing your own media allows you to be in much better control of what results come up in the search results pages and for which keywords. When flawlessly implemented, this concept allows you to dominate entire search results pages, thus harvesting most of the search traffic for the chosen search terms, leaving nothing to your competition.
Businesses of all sizes have in common the need to spread their messages and content via social media that reaches their audiences. Today, your business’s social networks can be critical in increasing and advertising the content on your site. Social (and real-life) networks are prime opportunities for content delivery, too. Just imagine what a trend-setting guest blogger or subject-matter expert interview could do for your company’s visibility and credibility!

Web traffic is the amount of data sent and received by visitors to a website. This necessarily does not include the traffic generated by bots. Since the mid-1990s, web traffic has been the largest portion of Internet traffic.[1] This is determined by the number of visitors and the number of pages they visit. Sites monitor the incoming and outgoing traffic to see which parts or pages of their site are popular and if there are any apparent trends, such as one specific page being viewed mostly by people in a particular country. There are many ways to monitor this traffic and the gathered data is used to help structure sites, highlight security problems or indicate a potential lack of bandwidth.
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