Great article as always. My wife is about to start a business about teaching (mainly) Mums how to film and edit little movies of their loved ones for posterity (www.lovethelittlethings.com launching soon). We have always struggled with thinking of and targeting relevant keywords because keywords like ‘videography’ and ‘family movies’ don’t really some up what she is about. Your article ties in with other learnings we have come across where we obviously need to reach out to right people and get them to share to get her product out there because purely focusing on keywords I don’t think will get us anywhere.
Holy Engagement! This was an awesome post, full of great info… and then I realized that 3/4 of the actual page was comments… which is even better for shares, SEO and overall engagement. I was lucky enough to attend an event where Neil Patel was giving some great blogging training and a lot of what you covered was there. https://www.thatbloggingthing.com/69-blogging-secrets-i-stole-from-neil-patel/ The simple fact that you comment back is awesome.
This particular site isn’t really an automatic traffic generator. Instead, it’s an old, long-running network for email lists. The idea is to build an email list independent of SEO or Google, which frees you from the rigors of content marketing. You still need to work to generate leads, and you still need a website to pull in opt-ins, but FFA gives you a wide range of tools you can use to succeed. For example, a heat map and Google Analytics integration ensures the system gives you all the information you need to succeed. You can split-test as many as 100 variants on a given page, to make sure you’re using the best one. And, of course, the network is old and long-running, meaning it has a positive reputation and a history of being effective. You can find plenty of support from the staff and other users.
Hi Brian, i absolutely love your content.My competitors and influence rs are very strong-most of them government bodies or supported by government, or travel guides known worldwide.I constantly follow them,get onto them.like,share,comment etc.they share photos that are submitted to them,and i do photography myself which takes hours and still can’t reach out big audience…Any idea please what could i create that my influence rs would love to share (hard to find out what they care,they get 100’s photos submitted daily and collaborate with other big names…) Please help me.
People want to speak their minds and weigh in on subjects they feel passionately about, so building a community into your site is a great way to start a conversation and increase traffic to your website. Implement a robust commenting system through third-party solutions such as Facebook comments or Disqus, or create a dedicated forum where visitors can ask questions. Don’t forget to manage your community to ensure that minimum standards of decorum are met, however.
Writing a list post on your blog, a life lesson, publishing a roundup, focusing on a money keyword and writing tons of posts around are some of the tactics that can double your traffic generation efforts. You will also find tips to convert one blog post idea into 10, the optimum length of the post to drive more clicks and links and much more in this Neil Patel and Sherice Jacob’s guide.
TrafficWave is, again, not quite a traffic exchange. Rather, it’s a valuable tool to use with the traffic you’ve already attained. It’s a fairly sophisticated autoresponder for email lists, with a 30-day trial and a suite of tools designed to help you put together the best autoresponses available. Use it in conjunction with any of your affiliate or referral programs for a sizable benefit.
Guest blogging is a two-way street. In addition to posting content to other blogs, invite people in your niche to blog on your own site. They’re likely to share and link to their guest article, which could bring new readers to your site. Just be sure that you only post high-quality, original content without spammy links, because Google is cracking way down on low-quality guest blogging.

Servers are able to compile every request for a web page, arming its operator with the information needed to determine how popular the site is and which pages receive the most attention. When a web server processes a file request, it makes an entry in what is known as the “server log” on the server's hard drive. The log gathers entries across posterity, forming a valuable database of information that the site owner can analyze to better understand the website's visitor activity.


As the name implies, 1MC is a program that allows you to rack up a sizable number of clicks to your website in a very short time. It advertises itself as a “fake traffic generator” and that’s really what it is; it’s not going to earn you any money through commissions or referrals. It may earn you cash through pay per view ads, particularly if you use a proxy list, but its primary purpose is typically for testing. If you want to make sure your analytics are accurately reporting clicks, you can schedule a number of clicks through the software and track them. You can also set it to freely spam a site with clicks, to test the server under load. You should, of course, avoid targeting competitors; they won’t take kindly to an unwanted server stress test.
Organic traffic is the traffic you get when people follow links from a search engine results page and land on your site. Organic traffic contrasts with referral traffic which comes from links on other sites, and paid traffic, which is traffic resulting from ads. You can boost organic traffic by using content marketing, and by optimizing that content with SEO. Well-optimized content is more likely to get a high search ranking, and attract more clicks and traffic.
Website tracking is very important in online marketing to be able to see how users are interacting on your site. The first choice is normally the tracking tool offered by the search engine, Google. But for data protection reasons, more and more users are looking for alternatives to Google Analytics. There’s a great selection of web analytics tools – we will examine applications with similar...

When Larry wrote about the kick in the proverbial teeth that eBay took from Google’s Panda update, we managed to secure a link from Ars Technica in the Editor’s Pick section alongside links to The New York Times and National Geographic. Not too shabby – and neither was the resulting spike in referral traffic. Learn what types of links send lots of referral traffic, and how to get them, in this post.


Web traffic is the amount of data sent and received by visitors to a website. This necessarily does not include the traffic generated by bots. Since the mid-1990s, web traffic has been the largest portion of Internet traffic.[1] This is determined by the number of visitors and the number of pages they visit. Sites monitor the incoming and outgoing traffic to see which parts or pages of their site are popular and if there are any apparent trends, such as one specific page being viewed mostly by people in a particular country. There are many ways to monitor this traffic and the gathered data is used to help structure sites, highlight security problems or indicate a potential lack of bandwidth.
×