Many websites do not publish their traffic figures, so it can often be difficult to get accurate values. However, some commercial websites offer media data as PDF files or else on an extra advertising page: there you will find all relevant traffic figures and even demographic data on visitor groups. Because information about traffic and target groups is extremely important for companies that want to advertise on websites, website operators only publish their figures out of self-interest to woo potential advertising partners.
Often when people start working for traffic on their website, they get a negative response from search engine results. Getting targeted traffic from search engines is not an easy task. Yet traffic being the fuel of all online business you need to get it somehow. Search engines are not sole gateway to drive traffic to your site, there are plenty more methods by which you can get your targeted traffic.
You probably visit at least a few sites that are relevant to your business on a regular basis, so why not join the conversation? Commenting doesn’t necessarily provide an immediate boost to referral traffic right away, but making a name for yourself by providing insightful, thought-provoking comments on industry blogs and sites is a great way to get your name out there – which can subsequently result in driving more traffic to your own site. Just remember that, as with guest posting, quality and relevance are key – you should be engaging with other people in your niche, not dropping spam links on unrelated websites.
When the world is crashing around you, trust the data. Dive into Google Analytics and try to pinpoint where things went south. Think back on marketing tactics you recently pushed live and find the correlation. This should lead you to an internal audit, where you may discover an internal tool is broken or an external force is impacting your site. - Kirk Deis, Treehouse 51

Web traffic is the amount of data sent and received by visitors to a website. This necessarily does not include the traffic generated by bots. Since the mid-1990s, web traffic has been the largest portion of Internet traffic.[1] This is determined by the number of visitors and the number of pages they visit. Sites monitor the incoming and outgoing traffic to see which parts or pages of their site are popular and if there are any apparent trends, such as one specific page being viewed mostly by people in a particular country. There are many ways to monitor this traffic and the gathered data is used to help structure sites, highlight security problems or indicate a potential lack of bandwidth.
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