This example illustrates why marketing metrics such as web traffic cannot be viewed in a vacuum. Two contrasting websites achieve the same outcome, where they are failing to capitalize on what they do well. By focusing on the one metric where they excel, it fails to acknowledge the area for improvement. By studying the whole picture and optimizing areas of subpar performance, ecommerce stores give their customers the best possible experience while maximizing revenue.

Organic traffic is the traffic you get when people follow links from a search engine results page and land on your site. Organic traffic contrasts with referral traffic which comes from links on other sites, and paid traffic, which is traffic resulting from ads. You can boost organic traffic by using content marketing, and by optimizing that content with SEO. Well-optimized content is more likely to get a high search ranking, and attract more clicks and traffic.
Use Google. Google Adwords is the most popular method for traffic. Since they are the top search engine right now it make sense to advertise there if you can afford it. You bid on keywords to get your site at the top of the search when your keyword comes up. There is more involved but it's all laid out at Google. There are a lot of other sites that use this advertising strategy called pay per click or PPC.

Note: Some of the high ranking pages may be on famous websites (Domain Authority of 90+). If so, it’s unlikely you’ll outrank them …unless, their high ranking page isn’t very focused on the topic. If you can make a higher quality page that better indicates it’s relevance by using the keyphrase, you may be able to outrank them! More on using keywords in a bit…


Use great titles for your content, titles which tempt or create curiosity – “How I got my website to load in 1.29 seconds” vs “Decrease your website load time”. Think “How I made Google my bitch!” vs “Improve your search engine rankings”. If necessary spend a lot of time  titles – they are the portals to your website. Especially if you want great Social Media traffic, you'll need to find titles which trigger emotional responses. Curiosity. Shock. Anger. Eagerness. Empathy.
This website traffic checker is also free of charge – you don’t even have to register. There is also no separation of free and paid services or information. Just enter the website you want to investigate, and with one click you can find out a lot of information – aside from the estimated traffic, the tool also provides an assessment of the examined website’s value.
Traffic exchange users are comparatively low quality, but they’re still real humans. You’re getting real people to view your site, you’re just not bringing them in organically the way Google intends. You can make money from these users, but your conversion rate will be typically lower than what you might see from organic traffic. Of course, it’s also much cheaper and faster to find this traffic than it is to invest in SEO and content marketing.
Whenever advertisers look for direct display ads or sponsored post ads on any blog or website they usually look for the metrics as those are the only signs via which one can get idea about the quality of website before even contacting with the owner. Getting targeted visitors via traffic generation tool will improve the rank and the rank will help you to get more advertisers who will pay you.

There were some great tips in this article. I notice that many people make the mistake of making too many distracting images in the header and the sidebar which can quickly turn people off content. I particularly dislike google ads anchored in the centre of a piece of text. I understand that people want to make a revenue for ads but there are right ways and wrong ways of going about this. The writing part of the content is the important part, why would you take a dump on it by pouring a load of conflicting media in the sides?


This particular site isn’t really an automatic traffic generator. Instead, it’s an old, long-running network for email lists. The idea is to build an email list independent of SEO or Google, which frees you from the rigors of content marketing. You still need to work to generate leads, and you still need a website to pull in opt-ins, but FFA gives you a wide range of tools you can use to succeed. For example, a heat map and Google Analytics integration ensures the system gives you all the information you need to succeed. You can split-test as many as 100 variants on a given page, to make sure you’re using the best one. And, of course, the network is old and long-running, meaning it has a positive reputation and a history of being effective. You can find plenty of support from the staff and other users.
So many great tips! There are a couple of things I’ve implemented recently to try and boost traffic. One is to make a pdf version of my post that people can download. It’s a great way to build a list:) Another way is to make a podcast out of my post. I can then take a snippet of it and place it on my Facebook page as well as syndicate it. As far as video I’ve started to create a video with just a few key points from the post. The suggestion about going back to past articles is a tip I am definitely going to use especially since long-form content is so important. Thanks!
For a website to be successful it all starts with landing pages that convert well and have high conversion rates. This means that a high percentage of the people that visit your website also actually perform a desired action. A desired action could be the purchase of a product, a membership registration, newsletter subscriptions or clicking on an advertisement, but it can also be any action that you want your visitors to do that goes beyond simple web browsing.
Website traffic is an indicator of how popular content is. As a website operator, the corresponding value also gives you an indication of how much traffic you need to generate to achieve similar success with other projects. Suppose you want to build a profitable blog on a specific topic: then you should know how much traffic the most successful bloggers generate in this area. By using a detailed competition analysis, you can then estimate which measures work for the competition and which ones don’t – conclusions that you can then use for your website.
Creating content with a baked-in incentive for thought leaders to share it like thought leader “round up” posts (Richard Marriott from Clambr has a great free in-depth guide on the subject here: http://www.clambr.com/expert-roundups/), best of lists, lists of tips and resources where you’re linking to and citing other folks’ content (which gives them an incentive to share)
Many websites do not publish their traffic figures, so it can often be difficult to get accurate values. However, some commercial websites offer media data as PDF files or else on an extra advertising page: there you will find all relevant traffic figures and even demographic data on visitor groups. Because information about traffic and target groups is extremely important for companies that want to advertise on websites, website operators only publish their figures out of self-interest to woo potential advertising partners.
You may also want to use a third-party website for advertising purposes: with well-placed ads on blogs and websites that match your target audience, you reach many potential customers. In this context, it also makes sense to check website traffic beforehand, since the more people that visit your site means that more people come into contact with your ads.
However I feel that batching all the things influencers share , filter whats relevant from whats not… and ultimately niche it down to identify which exact type of content is hot in order to build our own is a bit fuzzy. Influencers share SO MUCH content on a daily basis – how do you exactly identify the topic base you’ll use build great content that is guaranteed to be shared?
Websites produce traffic rankings and statistics based on those people who access the sites while using their toolbars and other means of online measurements. The difficulty with this is that it does not look at the complete traffic picture for a site. Large sites usually hire the services of companies such as the Nielsen NetRatings or Quantcast, but their reports are available only by subscription.
×