Brian Gray, ‘The Traveler”, was born in the US, grew up in Africa and now lives in Cambodia. To running out of gas crossing the Sahara or having his father kidnapped by actual rebels in Africa, he has some stories and adventures he could tell you! He uses his skills from 13 years in the education sector to now dive deep into analytics, traffic and testing and uses IM to continue to travel and explore. He has had clients like the EU, UN, World Vision, Vespa, Hennessy and Hyundai (just to name a few). He is our resident paid traffic and social media traffic expert.  

Glen takes various examples of how simple ideas and websites have gone viral in the past. He made a Feedburner mini-site and emailed a mere six people about it and tweeted the link once. The site had made to the HackerNews homepage the very next day, garnered 500 or so back links in a single day and the domain is now a PR 4. The whole thing was made in less than a day, looks ugly and is not even properly optimized for mobile.
Website operators pull out all the stops to try and guide visitors to their web presences, through advertisements, links, or simply high-quality content. To measure the impact of different measures, Google Analytics tracks the behavior of site visitors and sums it up in detailed statistics. But how does Google do this and how can this be useful for your site?
Web traffic is measured to see the popularity of websites and individual pages or sections within a site. This can be done by viewing the traffic statistics found in the web server log file, an automatically generated list of all the pages served. A hit is generated when any file is served. The page itself is considered a file, but images are also files, thus a page with 5 images could generate 6 hits (the 5 images and the page itself). A page view is generated when a visitor requests any page within the website – a visitor will always generate at least one page view (the main page) but could generate many more. Tracking applications external to the website can record traffic by inserting a small piece of HTML code in every page of the website.[2]
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