They are popping up at an ever-increasing rate. By socializing with others on the net through these sites, everything you join or participate in gives you more people to see your site. And, if you're selling stuff from your site, you'll want to go to the places (interest groups) on the social site where people are interested in what you're selling.
There are several web traffic referral sources. Organic traffic comes from search engines. Referral traffic comes from other websites. Display traffic comes from ads for your business on other sites. Paid traffic comes from promotions via sites like AdWords. Social traffic comes from social media sites. Each type of traffic can be further divided into individual traffic sources. For example, organic traffic can come from Google, Bing, or other search engines. And social traffic can come from a variety of sites.
Email marketing is one of the most effective ways for a small business to reach out to customers. Get started on your email marketing program by setting goals that support your overall marketing and business goals. Collect customer names and email addresses to build your business’s email list; you can do this by collecting them in-store or on your website.
If a web page is not listed in the first pages of any search, the odds of someone finding it diminishes greatly (especially if there is other competition on the first page). Very few people go past the first page, and the percentage that go to subsequent pages is substantially lower. Consequently, getting proper placement on search engines, a practice known as SEO, is as important as the website itself..[citation needed]
Google Analytics is an invaluable source of data on just about every conceivable aspect of your site, from your most popular pages to visitor demographics. Keep a close eye on your Analytics data, and use this information to inform your promotional and content strategies. Pay attention to what posts and pages are proving the most popular. Inspect visitor data to see how, where and when your site traffic is coming from.
Great article. My site has been up for several years now but I rebranded and switched from Blogger to WordPress about a year ago because I was told the reason why my traffic is so low is because I was using the wrong platform. I still haven’t seen an increase in my traffic and am very frustrated. I write in the health, fitness and parenting niche and I have over 30 experts that write for me, but I still don’t have the page views I would like. My paychecks are small and I am very frustrated. How do I find out what influencers in my niche are talking about and what they would like to share? I read tons of blogs, but most of them just review products or write about their kids, not a whole lot of similar articles. Where do I begin to find sharable content in my niche?

In a very crowded, noisy space – entrepreneurs and small business owners with a ton of “experts and influencers.” How do I get “above the noise?” I have built up a great brand and, I think, some great content based on a boatload of practical, real-life experience. I also have some products and services that I’m trying to sell, but I remain, “all dressed up, with no place to go.” Thoughts?


incredible post and just what i needed! i’m actually kinda new to blogging (my first year coming around) and so far my expertise has been in copy writing/seo copy writing. however link building has become tedious for me. your talk about influencing influencers makes perfect sense, but i find it difficult for my niche. my blog site is made as “gift ideas” and holiday shoppers complete with social networks. i get shares and such from my target audience, but i find that my “influencers” (i.e etsy, red box, vat19, etc.) don’t allow dofollow links and usually can’t find suitable sources. I guess my trouble is just prospecting in general.
So many great tips! There are a couple of things I’ve implemented recently to try and boost traffic. One is to make a pdf version of my post that people can download. It’s a great way to build a list:) Another way is to make a podcast out of my post. I can then take a snippet of it and place it on my Facebook page as well as syndicate it. As far as video I’ve started to create a video with just a few key points from the post. The suggestion about going back to past articles is a tip I am definitely going to use especially since long-form content is so important. Thanks!
A widespread tool for traffic analysis is SimilarWeb, owned by the Israeli SimilarGroup: upon entering the domain you will receive the most diverse data straight away. The tool reminds us a bit of Google Analytics with regard to the scope and data formatting. The way these analysis results are displayed is extremely helpful: for example, they show the temporal development of traffic and the various traffic channels, like social media, direct traffic, or e-mail. There is even a breakdown of the most relevant social media channels: you gain a lot of information about the online strategy of your competitors.
The traffic generation tip from Henneke Duistermaat – (from EnchantingMarketing website) it’s not based on traffic source to bring new visitors to website. Actually it is only based on how to keep their regular visitors and make they return to website again. She don’t explain how she brought new visitors to a website…. The others tips are very good.
It’s not enough to just share content through social channels – you need to actively participate in the community, too. Got a Twitter account? Then join in group discussions with relevant hashtags. Is your audience leaving comments on your Facebook posts? Answer questions and engage with your readers. Nothing turns people off quicker than using social media as a broadcast channel – use social media as it was intended and actually interact with your fans.

The first thing to investigate after a major dip in traffic is your website itself. Is it actually working? Is there a problem with the domain? Mechanically, is everything functioning as it should? If all that checks out, make sure the critical inbound links are still intact. If the majority of your traffic comes from inbound campaigns, ensure your inbound marketing platform is working properly. - Jeffrey Kamikow, Cross Audience
Brian Gray, ‘The Traveler”, was born in the US, grew up in Africa and now lives in Cambodia. To running out of gas crossing the Sahara or having his father kidnapped by actual rebels in Africa, he has some stories and adventures he could tell you! He uses his skills from 13 years in the education sector to now dive deep into analytics, traffic and testing and uses IM to continue to travel and explore. He has had clients like the EU, UN, World Vision, Vespa, Hennessy and Hyundai (just to name a few). He is our resident paid traffic and social media traffic expert. 
5. Distribute some freebies with your website logo on it like T-shirts and mugs. Organize free seminars in your local area; collaborate with important people there to increase the buzz. Or you may create some unique tool or a video and post it on Google for free, link your site with it. If your idea works off you may see a sudden burst of traffic coming your way.
Buying website traffic shouldn't be a replacement for SEO and other conventional methods of online marketing, but it can certainly give you that edge you need in the highly competitive online market. You can improve your Alexa ranking, time on site and lower bounce rate, but most importantly - it will drive potential clients and bring your website in front of your target audience long before you will see the first results of your conventional marketing strategies.

Headlines are one of the most important parts of your content. Without a compelling headline, even the most comprehensive blog post will go unread. Master the art of headline writing. For example, the writers at BuzzFeed and Upworthy often write upward of twenty different headlines before finally settling on the one that will drive the most traffic, so think carefully about your headline before you hit “publish.”


You may also want to use a third-party website for advertising purposes: with well-placed ads on blogs and websites that match your target audience, you reach many potential customers. In this context, it also makes sense to check website traffic beforehand, since the more people that visit your site means that more people come into contact with your ads.
In a very crowded, noisy space – entrepreneurs and small business owners with a ton of “experts and influencers.” How do I get “above the noise?” I have built up a great brand and, I think, some great content based on a boatload of practical, real-life experience. I also have some products and services that I’m trying to sell, but I remain, “all dressed up, with no place to go.” Thoughts?
For a website to be successful it all starts with landing pages that convert well and have high conversion rates. This means that a high percentage of the people that visit your website also actually perform a desired action. A desired action could be the purchase of a product, a membership registration, newsletter subscriptions or clicking on an advertisement, but it can also be any action that you want your visitors to do that goes beyond simple web browsing.
Thanks for a this timely article. If I understand it correctly, are you saying that we would better be off looking at market data in our niche and make an article of that for influencers to share rather than actionable tips that the target clients would be interested in? Shouldn’t there be a double strategy – articles for the influencers to share and articles for the users to enjoy?
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