The first thing to investigate after a major dip in traffic is your website itself. Is it actually working? Is there a problem with the domain? Mechanically, is everything functioning as it should? If all that checks out, make sure the critical inbound links are still intact. If the majority of your traffic comes from inbound campaigns, ensure your inbound marketing platform is working properly. - Jeffrey Kamikow, Cross Audience

The traffic generation tip from Henneke Duistermaat – (from EnchantingMarketing website) it’s not based on traffic source to bring new visitors to website. Actually it is only based on how to keep their regular visitors and make they return to website again. She don’t explain how she brought new visitors to a website…. The others tips are very good.

So many great tips! There are a couple of things I’ve implemented recently to try and boost traffic. One is to make a pdf version of my post that people can download. It’s a great way to build a list:) Another way is to make a podcast out of my post. I can then take a snippet of it and place it on my Facebook page as well as syndicate it. As far as video I’ve started to create a video with just a few key points from the post. The suggestion about going back to past articles is a tip I am definitely going to use especially since long-form content is so important. Thanks!
The way it works is quite simple - you choose the desired geo (country you’d like the visitors to come from) and the niche you want them to be interested in. You also choose how many visitors would you like us to deliver to you (the more you order, the more we’ll throw in on top for free) and over how many days would you like us to send them to you. After that - we take over, set your campaign up and open the tap. Using a mix of expired domains, the XML feed and other traffic sources, we direct the targeted visitors straight to your website.
The truth is, dear reader, that content overrules everything. You cannot make a success of a site unless you have the valued content there to begin with, as a foundation for your work. If that content is not there, nothing will come of it. If it is there and it’s valuable, the rest will pretty much take care of itself (aside from the physical aspect of site performance).
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However I feel that batching all the things influencers share , filter whats relevant from whats not… and ultimately niche it down to identify which exact type of content is hot in order to build our own is a bit fuzzy. Influencers share SO MUCH content on a daily basis – how do you exactly identify the topic base you’ll use build great content that is guaranteed to be shared?

“After enough time in the trenches, I’m a bit tired of the whole ‘I’ll scratch your back if you scratch mine’ mentality. So my goal is to show you how to scratch YOUR OWN back and be self reliant in your success and results moving forward. Best part of this? You get to be your OWN person… and follow your own path to the riches that will follow.” –Mark Tandan
No, unfortunately we can not guarantee that the absolute safety of Google Adsense Traffic. This is because we have seen instances in which websites were penalized for receiving large bulks of traffic (and clicks) to their Google Adsense ads. Therefore, if you use it, we strongly recommend you to use it in moderation and in conjunction with other traffic sources. More information >>
You select the geographical location where you want your visitors to come from and Also the most relevant target audience for you. For example, if your website is about movies and you want U.K visitors, You set your Traffic online Location to the United Kingdom and your Niche to movies. Let’s say you want around 1600 visitors per day for one month, then you can buy 50k visitors for a time span of 30 days. We’ll share it equally, around 1667 visitors per day.
I’m a big advocate of quality. It’s so much more important than frequency. In my experience, one great piece a month will get much better results than a so-so post once a week. But if you don’t want to reduce your frequency, you could try creating a format or series of posts that are easier to create, like interviews. This can fill in the weeks in between while you write something with more impact. Mix it up! 🙂
Getting systematic with traffic generation techniques is an important thing to do for regularizing the flow. Most bloggers will get enthusiastic about one strategy that is suggested by their favorite blogger and try that out. But they don’t follow that up. They forget about that strategy all together and move on to another method, without actually tracking what results that particular technique gives out. Consistency, patience and persistence matter a lot when it comes to traffic generation.
Why Rebels?  In the exciting and sometimes frustrating world of IM, there is one constant: hype. Too much of it, The Rebels believe. Excitement is great but too much hype can mislead prospective consumers, even lead them to make poor decisions. And that has led to many people having a perception of this industry that ranges from caution to considering it a complete sham. 
I am going to start by assuming you have identified who your target is. If you have done that homework (which most small businesses miss) then kudos to you. I will give you 4 pointers to help you drive targeted traffic. I will also forewarn you that these will cost you a lot of time and possibly a lot of money so I would also advise you to speak to someone who does these things professionally.
The amount of raw data you have doesn’t help you much. Jason tells you how to convert all that data into money. You can learn which landing pages are driving less traffic and are low on conversions. You can find out which mobile platforms are driving the most traffic to your site and optimize accordingly. Also, you can see your referral traffic sources and invest in them more.
No, this isn’t a tool to generate traffic jams on your way to work. Instead, it’s a piece of software a lot like 1MC, designed to send hits towards a website repeatedly. This one is a quick and easy to use program, with very little in the way of customization options, but that’s okay. It’s designed to do one thing and one thing only, and it does that thing.
After confirming that there’s no recent update to search algorithms throwing things out of whack, identify which traffic source has seen the greatest decline – direct, referral, organic, paid, social. After pinpointing the source, work backward to determine what actions (or inactions) could be at fault. Check your content consumption and be sure it is on point with your target audience. - Keri Witman, Cleriti
Like Quantcast, the Google Display Planner also features precise figures and information – although, once again, this website traffic checker only provides estimates. Access is free of charge and there are no additional fee-paying functions, letting you check as many websites as you want. The Google Display Planner  provides all the important data you need to quickly analyze foreign websites.
In my experience, a lot of people are more open about sharing traffic stats then you would think. You see this not just in interviews but if you peruse through the archived articles on a blog, there’s a good chance you’ll stumble upon a “blog in review” or “traffic report” post. With those stats, you can start to figure out how much traffic the site is getting today.
5) Post at the right time. Let’s say you want to post in the r/Entrepreneur/ subreddit, but there’s already a post in the #1 spot with 200 upvotes, and it was posted 4 hours ago. If you post at that time, you probably won’t overtake that #1 spot, and you’ll get less traffic. However, if you wait a day, check back, and see that the new #1 spot only has 12-15 upvotes, you’ll have a golden opportunity. It will be much easier for you to hit the #1 spot and get hundreds of upvotes.
This was very interesting. I run a website that promotes sports entertainment amongst teenagers who are graphic designers or video editors. The foundation is in place (Over 60 contributors) so my only focus is how to blog consistently about what goes on in the sports world with appeal to teenagers. I am confident i took a huge step today after learning these 4 steps!
Headlines are one of the most important parts of your content. Without a compelling headline, even the most comprehensive blog post will go unread. Master the art of headline writing. For example, the writers at BuzzFeed and Upworthy often write upward of twenty different headlines before finally settling on the one that will drive the most traffic, so think carefully about your headline before you hit “publish.”
Too much web traffic can dramatically slow down or prevent all access to a website. This is caused by more file requests going to the server than it can handle and may be an intentional attack on the site or simply caused by over-popularity. Large-scale websites with numerous servers can often cope with the traffic required, and it is more likely that smaller services are affected by traffic overload. Sudden traffic load may also hang your server or may result in a shutdown of your services.
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