The amount of raw data you have doesn’t help you much. Jason tells you how to convert all that data into money. You can learn which landing pages are driving less traffic and are low on conversions. You can find out which mobile platforms are driving the most traffic to your site and optimize accordingly. Also, you can see your referral traffic sources and invest in them more.

Many small businesses credit SEM for attracting new customers. Depending on the competition in your business, relying on unpaid, organic Web traffic via SEO may leave your business far back in the rankings. By paying for SEM, you have more control over the specific keywords that will promote you, as well as where you will appear on the search results page.
Google Analytics is an invaluable source of data on just about every conceivable aspect of your site, from your most popular pages to visitor demographics. Keep a close eye on your Analytics data, and use this information to inform your promotional and content strategies. Pay attention to what posts and pages are proving the most popular. Inspect visitor data to see how, where and when your site traffic is coming from.
Whatever industry you’re in, chances are there are at least one or two major conventions and conferences that are relevant to your business. Attending these events is a good idea – speaking at them is even better. Even a halfway decent speaking engagement is an excellent way to establish yourself as a thought leader in your industry and gain significant exposure for your site.

Web analytics is the measurement of the behavior of visitors to a website. In a commercial context, it especially refers to the measurement of which aspects of the website work towards the business objectives of Internet marketing initiatives; for example, which landing pages encourage people to make a purchase. Notable vendors of web analytics software and services include Google Analytics, IBM Digital Analytics (formerly Coremetrics) and Adobe Omniture.
×