Holy Engagement! This was an awesome post, full of great info… and then I realized that 3/4 of the actual page was comments… which is even better for shares, SEO and overall engagement. I was lucky enough to attend an event where Neil Patel was giving some great blogging training and a lot of what you covered was there. https://www.thatbloggingthing.com/69-blogging-secrets-i-stole-from-neil-patel/ The simple fact that you comment back is awesome.
Traffic exchange users are comparatively low quality, but they’re still real humans. You’re getting real people to view your site, you’re just not bringing them in organically the way Google intends. You can make money from these users, but your conversion rate will be typically lower than what you might see from organic traffic. Of course, it’s also much cheaper and faster to find this traffic than it is to invest in SEO and content marketing.

There are many option for a blog or website to drive traffic. You can buy paid traffic, you can use forums to promote your blog, and many more ways. Here I will share some of the working tips, which will make your blog traffic independent of search engines. One point that you should always remember “Content is king”, and if you want to retain those one-time visitors, you need to have outstanding content. A good idea is to offer premium content for free.


By purchasing cheap, high-quality and targeted site traffic you also get an opportunity to track the number of visitors who are visiting your site. This will allow you to incorporate changes in your marketing and selling strategies and thereby convert more visitors into permanent clients. Besides, you also get the opportunity to track real-time results and find out whether your investment is actually bringing you the desired results.

Web traffic is the amount of data sent and received by visitors to a website. This necessarily does not include the traffic generated by bots. Since the mid-1990s, web traffic has been the largest portion of Internet traffic.[1] This is determined by the number of visitors and the number of pages they visit. Sites monitor the incoming and outgoing traffic to see which parts or pages of their site are popular and if there are any apparent trends, such as one specific page being viewed mostly by people in a particular country. There are many ways to monitor this traffic and the gathered data is used to help structure sites, highlight security problems or indicate a potential lack of bandwidth.
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