Glen takes various examples of how simple ideas and websites have gone viral in the past. He made a Feedburner mini-site and emailed a mere six people about it and tweeted the link once. The site had made to the HackerNews homepage the very next day, garnered 500 or so back links in a single day and the domain is now a PR 4. The whole thing was made in less than a day, looks ugly and is not even properly optimized for mobile.
When the world is crashing around you, trust the data. Dive into Google Analytics and try to pinpoint where things went south. Think back on marketing tactics you recently pushed live and find the correlation. This should lead you to an internal audit, where you may discover an internal tool is broken or an external force is impacting your site. - Kirk Deis, Treehouse 51
Google is paying more attention to the meaning of search terms and less attention to the combinations of letters and words. It’s called “semantic search.” Scroll through the search results and see if other phrases, not just the phrase you entered, are bolded. If you see synonyms and related words in bold text, that means Google has created a semantic link between your words and these words. Write these down.
Servers are able to compile every request for a web page, arming its operator with the information needed to determine how popular the site is and which pages receive the most attention. When a web server processes a file request, it makes an entry in what is known as the “server log” on the server's hard drive. The log gathers entries across posterity, forming a valuable database of information that the site owner can analyze to better understand the website's visitor activity.
When Larry wrote about the kick in the proverbial teeth that eBay took from Google’s Panda update, we managed to secure a link from Ars Technica in the Editor’s Pick section alongside links to The New York Times and National Geographic. Not too shabby – and neither was the resulting spike in referral traffic. Learn what types of links send lots of referral traffic, and how to get them, in this post.
Web traffic is the amount of data sent and received by visitors to a website. This necessarily does not include the traffic generated by bots. Since the mid-1990s, web traffic has been the largest portion of Internet traffic.[1] This is determined by the number of visitors and the number of pages they visit. Sites monitor the incoming and outgoing traffic to see which parts or pages of their site are popular and if there are any apparent trends, such as one specific page being viewed mostly by people in a particular country. There are many ways to monitor this traffic and the gathered data is used to help structure sites, highlight security problems or indicate a potential lack of bandwidth.
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