Traffic exchange users are comparatively low quality, but they’re still real humans. You’re getting real people to view your site, you’re just not bringing them in organically the way Google intends. You can make money from these users, but your conversion rate will be typically lower than what you might see from organic traffic. Of course, it’s also much cheaper and faster to find this traffic than it is to invest in SEO and content marketing.
When someone visits a website, their computer or other web-connected device communicates with the website's server. Each page on the web is made up of dozens of distinct files. The site's server transmits each file to user browsers where they are assembled and formed into a cumulative piece with graphics and text. Every file sent represents a single “hit”, so a single page viewing can result in numerous hits.
Website traffic is an indicator of how popular content is. As a website operator, the corresponding value also gives you an indication of how much traffic you need to generate to achieve similar success with other projects. Suppose you want to build a profitable blog on a specific topic: then you should know how much traffic the most successful bloggers generate in this area. By using a detailed competition analysis, you can then estimate which measures work for the competition and which ones don’t – conclusions that you can then use for your website.
Web traffic is the amount of data sent and received by visitors to a website. This necessarily does not include the traffic generated by bots. Since the mid-1990s, web traffic has been the largest portion of Internet traffic.[1] This is determined by the number of visitors and the number of pages they visit. Sites monitor the incoming and outgoing traffic to see which parts or pages of their site are popular and if there are any apparent trends, such as one specific page being viewed mostly by people in a particular country. There are many ways to monitor this traffic and the gathered data is used to help structure sites, highlight security problems or indicate a potential lack of bandwidth.
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