For a website to be successful it all starts with landing pages that convert well and have high conversion rates. This means that a high percentage of the people that visit your website also actually perform a desired action. A desired action could be the purchase of a product, a membership registration, newsletter subscriptions or clicking on an advertisement, but it can also be any action that you want your visitors to do that goes beyond simple web browsing.


They are popping up at an ever-increasing rate. By socializing with others on the net through these sites, everything you join or participate in gives you more people to see your site. And, if you're selling stuff from your site, you'll want to go to the places (interest groups) on the social site where people are interested in what you're selling.
Glen takes various examples of how simple ideas and websites have gone viral in the past. He made a Feedburner mini-site and emailed a mere six people about it and tweeted the link once. The site had made to the HackerNews homepage the very next day, garnered 500 or so back links in a single day and the domain is now a PR 4. The whole thing was made in less than a day, looks ugly and is not even properly optimized for mobile.

I am new at this. I have been researching keywords and have found a few keyword phrases that nobody in the first page of Google results is even using in their Title Tag or H1 Tag. Some of the companies on the results page have a high pagerank and lots of backlinks. If I optimize for this exact keyword phrase with a new website, would I have much of a chance of getting on the first page eventually?
Writing a list post on your blog, a life lesson, publishing a roundup, focusing on a money keyword and writing tons of posts around are some of the tactics that can double your traffic generation efforts. You will also find tips to convert one blog post idea into 10, the optimum length of the post to drive more clicks and links and much more in this Neil Patel and Sherice Jacob’s guide.

Web traffic is the amount of data sent and received by visitors to a website. This necessarily does not include the traffic generated by bots. Since the mid-1990s, web traffic has been the largest portion of Internet traffic.[1] This is determined by the number of visitors and the number of pages they visit. Sites monitor the incoming and outgoing traffic to see which parts or pages of their site are popular and if there are any apparent trends, such as one specific page being viewed mostly by people in a particular country. There are many ways to monitor this traffic and the gathered data is used to help structure sites, highlight security problems or indicate a potential lack of bandwidth.

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